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Inner Journeys, LLC Group

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Henry Cruz
Henry Cruz

Le Guide Du Vagin



Results: In France, 5% of women have breech deliveries (level of evidence [LE] 3). One third of them have a planned vaginal delivery (LE3), and 70% of these give birth vaginally (LE3). External cephalic version (ECV) is associated with lower rates of both breech presentation at birth (LE2) and of cesarean deliveries (LE3) without any increase in severe maternal (LE3) or perinatal morbidity (LE3). Women with a fetus in breech presentation at term should be informed that ECV can be attempted starting at 36 weeks of gestation (professional consensus). Planned vaginal delivery of breech presentation may be associated with a higher risk of composite perinatal mortality or serious neonatal morbidity than planned cesarean birth (LE2). These two modes do not differ for neurodevelopmental outcomes at two years (LE2), cognitive and psychomotor outcomes between 5 and 8 years (LE3), or adult intellectual performance (LE4). Short- and long-term maternal complications appear similar in the two groups, unless subsequent pregnancies are under consideration. Pregnancies after a cesarean delivery are at higher risk of uterine rupture, placenta accreta spectrum disorders, and hysterectomy (LE2). Women who want a planned vaginal delivery should be offered a pelvimetry at term (Grade C) and should have ultrasonography to verify that the fetal head is not hyperextended (professional consensus) to plan their mode of delivery. Complete breech presentation, a previous cesarean, nulliparity, and term prelabor rupture of membranes are not, each one by itself, per se contraindications to planned vaginal delivery (professional consensus). Term breech presentation is not a contraindication to labor induction when the criteria for planned vaginal delivery are met (Grade C).




Le guide du Vagin



Conclusion: In cases of breech presentation at term, the child and the mother are at low risk of severe morbidity after either planned vaginal or planned cesarean delivery. The French College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (CNGOF) considers that planned vaginal delivery is a reasonable option in most cases (professional consensus). The decision about the planned route of delivery should be shared by the woman and her healthcare provider, who must respect her right to autonomy.


The Vagina Monologues is an episodic play written in 1996 by Eve Ensler which developed and premiered at HERE Arts Center, Off-Off-Broadway in New York and was followed by an Off-Broadway run in at Westside Theatre. The play explores consensual and nonconsensual sexual experiences, body image, genital mutilation, direct and indirect encounters with reproduction, vaginal care, menstrual periods, prostitution, and several other topics through the eyes of women with various ages, races, sexualities, and other differences.[1]


Eve Ensler wrote the first draft of the monologues in 1996 (there have been several revisions since) following interviews she conducted with 200 women about their views on sex, relationships, and violence against women. The interviews began as casual conversations with her friends, who then brought up anecdotes they themselves had been told by other friends; this began a continuing chain of referrals. In an interview with Women.com, Ensler said that her fascination with vaginas began because of "growing up in a violent society".[6] "Women's empowerment is deeply connected to their sexuality." She also stated, "I'm obsessed with women being violated and raped, and with incest. All of these things are deeply connected to our vaginas."


Ensler wrote the piece to "celebrate the vagina". Ensler states that in 1998, the purpose of the piece changed from a celebration of vaginas and femininity to a movement to stop violence against women. This was the start of the V-Day movement[7] which has continued strong every year since, has turned into a worldwide phenomenon, and a very successful non-profit organization.[7]


The Vagina Monologues is made up of various personal monologues read by a diverse group of women. Originally, Eve Ensler performed every monologue herself, with subsequent performances featuring three actresses, and more recent versions featuring a different actress for every role. Each of the monologues deals with an aspect of the feminine experience, touching on matters such as sex, sex work, body image, love, rape, menstruation, female genital mutilation, masturbation, birth, orgasm, the various common names for the vagina or simply as a physical aspect of the body. A recurring theme throughout the piece is the vagina as a tool of female empowerment, and the ultimate embodiment of individuality.


The Vagina Monologues has been criticized by some within the feminist movement, including pro-sex feminists and individualist feminists.[19] Sex-positive feminist Betty Dodson, author of several books about female sexuality, saw the play as having a narrow and restrictive view of sexuality. Dodson's main concern seemed to be the lack of the term "clitoris" throughout the play. She believes that the play sends a message that the vagina is the main sex organ, not the clitoris. There is also criticism of The Vagina Monologues about its conflation of vaginas with women, more specifically for the message of the play that women are their vaginas, as Susan E. Bell and Susan M. Reverby argue, "Generations of feminists have argued that we are more than our bodies, more than a vagina or 'the sex'. Yet, TVM re-inscribes women's politics in our bodies, indeed in our vaginas alone".[20] The focus on women finding themselves through their vaginas, many say, seems more like a Second Wave consciousness-raising group rather than a ground-breaking, inter-sectional, Third Wave cornerstone.[20]


Because of the title and content of The Vagina Monologues being body-centric, American University chose to change their production of it to a new show including all-original pieces, giving the production the name of Breaking Ground Monologues.[21] Although members of American University's Women's Initiative believe that the show was revolutionary in the 1990s, they concluded that equating having a vagina with being a woman is not an accurate display of womanhood in the 2010s, suggesting that The Vagina Monologues continues to perpetuate the gender binary and erase the identity of those who are genderqueer.[21]


In The Vagina Monologues, depictions of sexual violence are told through mostly non-white and non-US centered stories, as Srimati Basu states, "While a few of these forms of violence, such as sexual assault and denigration of genitalia, are depicted in U.S. locations, violence is the primary register through which 'the global' is evoked, the main lens for looking outside the United States. These global locations serve to signify the terror that is used to hold the laughter in balance, to validate the seriousness of the enterprise, while the 'vagina' pieces are more directly associated with pleasure and sexuality and set in the United States".[24]


Au contraire, une cup taille M (taille standard) conviendra à des vagins moins étroits, plus relâchés, avec un périnée moins tonique, ayant connu un accouchement par voie basse par exemple.


Vaginal hysterectomy is the recommended approach by ACOG (American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists), AAGL (American Association of Gynecologic Laparoscopists), Cochrane, and ISGE (International Society for Gynecologic Endoscopy) whenever indicated and feasible.1,2,3,4 Despite these recommendations and supporting clinical evidence, the global rate of vaginal hysterectomies appears to have steadily declined. Some of the challenges that contribute to lower adoption of the vaginal approach include lack of visibility and reduced access to the anatomy. Access to the adnexa can be particularly challenging, with failure rates of up to 36%.5,6 vNOTES (vaginal natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery) modernizes vaginal surgery. Innovative advanced access platforms enable access into the peritoneal cavity through the vagina, effectively combining the benefits of laparoscopic and traditional vaginal surgery.


vNOTES (vaginal natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery) is another choice to consider for your hysterectomy and other gynecologic procedures. vNOTES is a minimally invasive surgery that eliminates the need for your surgeon to make incisions in your abdomen to perform the surgery.


In the vNOTES procedure, your doctor uses specialized instruments inserted through the vagina instead of making incisions in your abdomen. This allows your doctor to gain access to the uterus and/or fallopian tubes and ovaries without any visible scarring.


Only a trained doctor can determine whether you are eligible for a vNOTES procedure. All minimally invasive surgical procedures, including vNOTES, present risks to the patient, such as the potential for conversion to a traditional vaginal, laparoscopic or abdominal approach. These specific risks may only be evaluated in consultation with a doctor experienced in vNOTES procedures.


Vaginal hysterectomy is the recommended approach by ACOG (American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists), AAGL (American Association of Gynecologic Laparoscopists), Cochrane, and ISGE (International Society for Gynecologic Endoscopy), whenever indicated and feasible.1-4 Despite these recommendations and supporting clinical evidence, the global rate of vaginal hysterectomies appears to have steadily declined. Some of the challenges that contribute to lower adoption of the vaginal approach include lack of visibility and reduced access to the anatomy. Access to the adnexa can be particularly challenging, with failure rates of up to 36%.5,6 vNOTES (vaginal natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery) modernizes vaginal surgery. Innovative advanced access platforms enable access into the peritoneal cavity through the vagina, effectively combining the benefits of laparoscopic and traditional vaginal surgery. 041b061a72


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