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Raj Rivera
Raj Rivera

Fleming's Left And Right Hand Rule Pdf Download [CRACKED]



Fleming's left-hand rule for electric motors is one of a pair of visual mnemonics, the other being Fleming's right-hand rule[1] (for generators).[2][3] They were originated by John Ambrose Fleming, in the late 19th century, as a simple way of working out the direction of motion in an electric motor, or the direction of electric current in an electric generator.




fleming's left and right hand rule pdf download


Download: https://www.google.com/url?q=https%3A%2F%2Fbytlly.com%2F2tLj8i&sa=D&sntz=1&usg=AOvVaw1u_EwwzqLYgdUJDoFOK9fZ



When current flows through a conducting wire, and an external magnetic field is applied across that flow, the conducting wire experiences a force perpendicular both to that field and to the direction of the current flow (i.e they are mutually perpendicular). A left hand can be held, as shown in the illustration, so as to represent three mutually orthogonal axes on the thumb, fore finger and middle finger. Each finger is then assigned to a quantity (mechanical force, magnetic field and electric current). The right and left hand are used for generators and motors respectively.


Of course, if the mnemonic is taught (and remembered) with a different arrangement of the parameters to the fingers, it could end up as a mnemonic that also reverses the roles of the two hands (instead of the standard left hand for motors, right hand for generators). These variants are catalogued more fully on the [FBI mnemonics] page.


Fleming's left-hand rule is used for electric motors, while Fleming's right-hand rule is used for electric generators. In other words, Fleming's left hand rule should be used if one were to create motion, while Fleming's right hand rule should be used if one were to create electricity.


In an electric motor, the electric current and magnetic field exist (which are the causes), and they lead to the force that creates the motion (which is the effect), and so the left-hand rule is used. In an electric generator, the motion and magnetic field exist (causes), and they lead to the creation of the electric current (effect), and so the right-hand rule is used.


The direction of the induced magnetic field can be remembered by Maxwell's corkscrew rule. That is, if the conventional current is flowing away from the viewer, the magnetic field runs clockwise round the conductor, in the same direction that a corkscrew would have to turn in order to move away from the viewer. The direction of the induced magnetic field is also sometimes remembered by the right-hand grip rule, as depicted in the illustration, with the thumb showing the direction of the conventional current, and the fingers showing the direction of the magnetic field. The existence of this magnetic field can be confirmed by placing magnetic compasses at various points round the periphery of an electrical conductor that is carrying a relatively large electric current.


Right-Hand Thumb Rule: If a current carrying conductor is held by right hand, keeping the thumb straight and if the direction of electric current is in the direction of thumb, then the direction of wrapping of other fingers will show the direction of magnetic field.


The right hand rule is a hand mnemonic used in physics to identify the direction of axes or parameters that point in three dimensions.Invented in the 19th century by British physicist John Ambrose Fleming for applications in electromagnetism, the right hand rule is mostoften used to determine the direction of a third parameter when the other two are known (magnetic field, current, magnetic force).There are a few variations of the right hand rule, which are explained in this section.


When a conductor, such as a copper wire, moves through a magnetic field (B), an electric current (I) is induced in the conductor.This phenomenon is known as Faraday's Law of Induction. If the conductor is moved inside the magnetic field, then there is a relationshipbetween the directions of the conductor's motion (velocity), magnetic field and the induced current. We can use Fleming's right hand ruleto investigate Faraday's Law of Induction, which is represented by the equation:


Because the x, y and z axes are perpendicular to one another and form right angles, the right hand rule can be used to visualize theiralignment in three-dimensional space. To use the right hand rule, begin by making an L-shape using your right thumb, pointer and middlefinger. Then, move your middle finger inwards toward your palm, so that it is perpendicular to your pointer finger and thumb. Your handshould look similar to this:


One of the best ways to help students become confident using the right hand rule, is to perform a visual demonstration that helps them recognize and correct their misconceptions about orthogonal relationships and coordinate systems.


The right hand rule states that: to determine the direction of the magnetic force on a positive moving charge, point your right thumb inthe direction of the velocity (v), your index finger in the direction of the magnetic field (B), and your middle finger will point in thedirection of the the resulting magnetic force (F). Negative charges will be affected by a force in the opposite direction.


A conventional current is composed of moving charges that are positive in nature. When a conventional current moves through a conducting wire,the wire is affected by a magnetic field that pushes it. We can use the right hand rule to identify the direction of the force acting on thecurrent-carrying wire. In this model, your fingers point in the direction of the magnetic field, your thumb points in the direction of theconventional current running through the wire, and your palm indicates the direction that the wire is being pushed (force).


If we consider current flow as the movement of positive charge carriers (conventional current) in the aboveimage, we notice that the conventional current is moving up the page. Since a conventional current is composedof positive charges, then the same current-carrying wire can also be described as having a current with negativecharge carriers moving down the page. Although these currents are moving in opposite directions, a singlemagnetic force is observed acting on the wire. Therefore, the force occurs in the same direction whether weconsider the flow of positive or negative charge carriers in the above image. Applying the right hand rule tothe direction of the conventional current indicates the direction of the magnetic force to be pointed right.When we consider the flow of negative charge carriers in the above image, the right hand rule indicates thedirection of the force to be left; however, the negative sign reverses the result, indicating that the directionof the magnetic force is indeed pointing right.


If we consider the flow of charges in two different wires, one with positive charges flowing up the page, and onewith negative charges flowing up the page, then the direction of the magnetic forces will not be the same, becausewe are considering two different physical situations. In the first wire, the flow of positive charges up the pageindicates that negative charges are flowing down the page. Using the right hand rule tells us that the magneticforce will point in the right direction. In the second wire, the negative charges are flowing up the page, whichmeans the positive charges are flowing down the page. As a result, the right hand rule indicates that the magneticforce is pointing in the left direction.


While a magnetic field can be induced by a current, a current can also be induced by a magnetic field. We can usethe second right hand rule, sometimes called the right hand grip rule, to determine the direction of the magneticfield created by a current. To use the right hand grip rule, point your right thumb in the direction of the current'sflow and curl your fingers. The direction of your fingers will mirror the curled direction of the induced magnetic field.


The right hand grip rule is especially useful for solving problems that consider a current-carrying wire or solenoid.In both situations, the right hand grip rule is applied to two applications of Ampere's circuital law, which relatesthe integrated magnetic field around a closed loop to the electric current passing through the plane of the closed loop.


When an electric current passes through a solenoid, it creates a magnetic field. To use the right hand grip rule ina solenoid problem, point your fingers in the direction of the conventional current and wrap your fingers as if theywere around the solenoid. Your thumb will point in the direction of the magnetic field lines inside the solenoid. Notethat the magnetic field lines are in the opposite direction outside the solenoid. They wrap around from the inside tothe outside of the solenoid.


When an electric current passes through a straight wire, it induces a magnetic field. To apply the right hand grip rule,align your thumb with the direction of the conventional current (positive to negative) and your fingers will indicate thedirection of the magnetic lines of flux.


Torque problems are often the most challenging topic for first year physics students. Luckily, there's a right hand ruleapplication for torque as well. To use the right hand rule in torque problems, take your right hand and point it in thedirection of the position vector (r or d), then turn your fingers in the direction of the force and your thumb will pointtoward the direction of the torque.


A cross product, or vector product, is created when an ordered operation is performed on two vectors, a and b. Thecross product of vectors a and b, is perpendicular to both a and b and is normal to the plane that contains it. Sincethere are two possible directions for a cross product, the right hand rule should be used to determine the directionof the cross product vector.


To apply the right hand rule to cross products, align your fingers and thumb at right angles. Then, point your indexfi


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